Blog Posts - Genetics



Hijacking the double helix for replication

For years, scientists have puzzled over what prompts the intertwined double-helix DNA to open its two strands and then start replication. Knowing this could be the key to understanding how organisms -- from healthy cells to cancerous tumors -- replic...
by The Archaeology News Network on Dec 15, 2016

New study doubles the estimate of bird species in the world

New research led by the American Museum of Natural History suggests that there are about 18,000 bird species in the world—nearly twice as many as previously thought. The work focuses on "hidden" avian diversity—birds that look similar to one anot...
by The Archaeology News Network on Dec 14, 2016

Increased burden of deleterious variants in essential genes in autism spectrum disorder

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by impaired social interaction, communication, and repetitive behavior. It is estimated that hundreds of genes contribute to ASD. We asked i...
by PolygenicBlog on Dec 13, 2016

Genetic Management of Fragmented Animal and Plant Populations

That is the title of a new textbook that will be available mid-2017. After almost 6 years work, authors Dick Frankham, Jonathan Ballou, Katherine Ralls, Mark Eldridge, Michele Dudash, Charles Fenster, Bob Lacy & Paul Sunnucks have produced an...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 10, 2016

Rio 2016: Long Distance Running Is a Darwinian Enigma

Fabienne St Louis (seen here in 2011) took part in the women’s triathlon in Rio despite a cancer diagnosis. Image courtesy of MartinPutz, Creative Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0). Joel Kontinen Some animal rights activists seem to think that chimpanzee...
by Joel Kontinen on Aug 21, 2016

Desert elephants pass on knowledge - not mutations - to survive

Despite reported differences in appearance and behavior, DNA evidence finds that Namibian desert elephants share the same DNA as African savanna elephants. However, Namibian desert-dwelling elephants should be protected so they can continue to pass o...
by The Archaeology News Network on Aug 5, 2016

New genome reveals how Arctic microbes survive in cold extreme habitats

Scientists at the University of Bristol have revealed how a tiny Arctic microbe, crucial to shaping the surface of glaciers, survives in such extreme conditions. The cyanobacterium Phormidesmis priestleyi BC1401 was isolated from cryoconite  on...
by The Archaeology News Network on Aug 5, 2016

'Red gene' in birds and turtles suggests dinosaurs had bird-like colour vision

Earlier this year, scientists used zebra finches to pinpoint the gene that enables birds to produce and display the colour red. Dinosaurs would have had the same ability to see a wide spectrum of redness as birds and turtles,  according to a ne...
by The Archaeology News Network on Aug 5, 2016

Where there's smoke and a mutation there may be an evolutionary edge for humans

A genetic mutation may have helped modern humans adapt to smoke exposure from fires and perhaps sparked an evolutionary advantage over their archaic competitors, including Neanderthals, according to a team of researchers. A genetic mutation that is...
by The Archaeology News Network on Aug 5, 2016

Genetika: Pengertian, Kromosom, Hereditas, Konsep Mendel, Tipe Persilangan, Sex Linkage dan Aplikasinya

Pengertian  Genetika Genetika adalah ilmu yang mempelajari sifat-sifat keturunan (hereditas) serta segala seluk-beluknya secara ilmiah. Orang yang dianggap sebagai "Bapak Genetika" adalah Johan Gregor Mendel. Dalam genetika kita mengenal...
by Pintar Biologi on Aug 1, 2016

A federal origin of Stone Age farming

The transition from hunter-gatherer to sedentary farming 10,000 years ago occurred in multiple neighbouring but genetically distinct populations according to research by an international team including UCL. The Fertile Crescent (shaded) on a politic...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jul 16, 2016

Viruses revealed to be a major driver of human evolution

The constant battle between pathogens and their hosts has long been recognized as a key driver of evolution, but until now scientists have not had the tools to look at these patterns globally across species and genomes. In a new study, researchers ap...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jul 15, 2016

The telltale heart of chordate evolution

A new study led by researchers of the University of Barcelona and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio), published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, proves once more that evolution does not always imply more complexity or more gen...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jul 15, 2016

Conserved microRNAs may regulate limb regeneration in evolutionarily distant species

Several conserved microRNAs, or short, highly conserved noncoding RNAs that are targeted to and inhibit expression of specific genes, may be involved in the regulation of limb regeneration across evolutionarily distant species, according to a study p...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jul 1, 2016

Decoding the complete genome of the Mediterranean’s most emblematic tree: the olive

The olive was one of the first trees to be domesticated in the history of mankind, probably some 6,000 years ago. A Mediterranean emblem par excellence, it is of vital importance to the Spanish and other regional economies (Italy, Greece and Portugal...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jul 1, 2016

‘Undead’ genes come alive days after life ends

Does death really mean the end of our existence? Great thinkers from Plato to Blue Öyster Cult have weighed in on the question. Now, a study shows that that at least one aspect of life continues: Genes remain turned on days after animals die. Resear...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jul 1, 2016

Researchers find human development’s first gear

Oxford University researchers are closer to solving a decade-old mystery after discovering that a set of genes they are studying play a key role in early human development. Genes only act in one brief period during the early stages of an embryo ...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jun 30, 2016

Elongated skull from Silla culture unearthed in Korea

The grave of a woman with a bizarre, long-headed skull has been unearthed in Korea. The woman was part of the ancient Silla culture, which ruled much of the Korean peninsula for nearly a millennium. The reassembled skull [Credit: Won-Joon Lee et al/...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jun 26, 2016

Hairs, feathers and scales have a lot in common

The potential evolutionary link between hairs in mammals, feathers in birds and scales in reptiles has been debated for decades. Today, researchers of the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Switzerland, demons...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jun 26, 2016

Extinction synergy: deadly combination of human hunting & climate change wrote off Patagonian giants

Here’s a paper we’ve just had published in Science Advances (Synergistic roles of climate warming and human occupation in Patagonian megafaunal extinctions during the Last Deglaciation). It’s an excellent demonstration of our concep...
by Conservation Bytes on Jun 19, 2016


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