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An evolving tribute to Operation Varsity, the last airborne operation of WWII and the largest single-lift airborne operation of all time.

Owner: marveuk

Listed in: Academics

Language: English

Tags: airborne, rhine, varsity

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Latest Blog Posts for The Last Drop: Operation Varsity 24-25 March 1945

  • So, was Varsity necessary? Part III
    on Apr 28, 2011
    Charles B. MacDonald believes that Varsity “unquestionably aided British ground troops.” Yet he also wrote in United States Army in World War II, European Theater of Operations:The Last Offensive that “although the objectives assigned the divis...
  • So, was Varsity necessary? Part II
    on Apr 19, 2011
    Charles B. MacDonald believes that Varsity “unquestionably aided British ground troops.” Yet he also wrote in United States Army in World War II, European Theater of Operations:The Last Offensive that “althoughthe objectives assigned the divisi...
  • So, was Varsity necessary? Part I
    on Apr 17, 2011
    In his report, Gen. Matthew Ridgway said he believed that "the airborne drop was of such depth that all enemy artillery and rear defensive positions were included and destroyed, reducing in one day a position that might have taken many days to reduce...
  • The Aircraft: The WACO CG-4A
    on Apr 3, 2011
    The Weaver Aircraft Company (WACO) of Troy, Ohio, did not begin construction of its CG-4A, rechristened Hadrian by the British, until mid-1941.The first was delivered in April 1942, and by the end of the war, close to 14,000 had been built. Of these,...
  • The Aircraft: The Airspeed Horsa Mks I & II
    on Apr 3, 2011
    Airspeed Limited’s twenty-eight-seater was named Horsa, after the fifth-century German mercenary.The prototype took to the air on 12 September 1941, with the first production model appearing in June 1942. In all, some 3,500 were produced during the...
  • The Aircraft: The Douglas C-47 'Dakota'
    on Apr 2, 2011
    The C-47, probably the most recognised of all World War II transport aircraft, was adapted from the DC-3 commercial airliner and was used to carry personnel and cargo, tow gliders and drop paratroops. Affectionatelyknown as the Goony Bird, by the Ame...
  • The Participants: 2. US 17th Airborne Division
    on Apr 2, 2011
    The men who would become the 17th Airborne Division arrived at Camp Mackall, North Carolina, where they were placed under the command of Major General William M.“Bud” Miley.The constituent units of the 17th were somewhat different from those o...
  • The Aircraft: The Curtiss C-46 'Commando'
    on Apr 2, 2011
    The C-46 was a true workhorse of the U.S. Army Air Force, especially in the Pacific theater. The type first flew on 26 March 1940 and was powered by two Pratt and Whitney R-2800s, which gave it a top speed of 269 miles per hour (433 kilometers per ho...
  • The Participants: 1. British 6th Airborne Division
    on Mar 31, 2011
    The 6th Airborne Division began to take shape in May 1943, under the command of Major General Richard Gale. It consisted of two parachute brigades, an airlanding (gliderborne) brigade and divisional troops from the Royal Armoured Corps, Royal Arti...
  • An operation of 'firsts' and onlys'
    on Mar 27, 2011
    The first and only time in the war that the Curtiss C-46 Commando was used to carry paratroops operationally.The first and only time that the WACO CG-4A glider was successfully double-towed operationally.The first and only time that the Airspeed Hors...
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